About Cindy Giao

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So far Cindy Giao has created 53 blog entries.

Why a new calf needs a tidy shed

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 21, 2018|Calving|

The most efficient cattle operations never consider tidy housing a waste of time. Washing, tidying and maintaining a hygienic cattle shed has financial, health and time benefits down the line.

Here are the reasons it is particularly important for calves to have a tidy shed.

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What NOT to do when reviving your newborn calf

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 21, 2018|Calving|

Sometimes when a calf is born, often after a difficult birth, they have difficulty breathing at first.

There are a number of things you can do to help in this case: 'christening' them, 'hanging' the calf, stimulating their nostrils with a bit of straw, and more.

However, while you may intervene to help the calf, there are things you can do that could potentially harm them too.

Here are some tips to avoid that.

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Mature weights in cattle – is bigger really better?

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 20, 2018|Breeding|

Many beef farmers place a good high mature weight as the most important factor when planning sires for the year ahead.

However, to go exclusively off that would be foolish, and if they are on a small to medium sized operation it could lead to problems down the line.

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Uterine prolapses and a Vaginal prolapses in cattle

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 20, 2018|Calving|

A prolapse is the slipping forward or down of a part or organ of the body.

Uterine and Vaginal are both relatively common prolapses to occur at calving time. Here is a breakdown on both and what they mean to a beef producer.

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How to care for your stock bull

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 19, 2018|Breeding|

The stock bull is a fixture in many Irish suckler farms. However, while they are the primary method of getting cows and heifers in calf in most of these operations, 3-4% of bulls are infertile.

As well as that, a further 15-20% are partially or periodically infertile according to Teagasc.

While some of the latter figure is inevitable, some of it can be prevented with early intervention. And if you identify your infertile bull early, you can minimise your losses.

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What Makes Moocall HEAT stand out?

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 19, 2018|News|

Our latest product Moocall HEAT takes the hassle out of heat detection in cows and heifers.

The system - made up of an electronic neck collar for the bull and Moocall RFID tags for the cow - detects 98% of heats in cattle including silent heats.

While farming technology already has some solutions to heat detection, here's what sets our product apart.

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Lameness and Arthritis in Bulls

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 16, 2018|Breeding|

Lameness in bulls is a major impediment to their reproductive performance - as you can well imagine, it makes their job a lot harder.

It is a common condition with 20-35% of cows suffering from it to some degree. If a bull has a lameness problem he probably won’t be able to perform his task.

Lameness in bulls can come about for a number of reasons, including:

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6 Factors that affect stock bull fertility

2021-03-02T14:31:55+00:00February 16, 2018|News|

When it comes to bulls, fertility is of upmost importance. Their job is securing the future of your herd, and if he can't do that to his best ability then it can put a farmer out of pocket.

Sometimes you can help him, sometimes you can't. Here are a number of things that affect a bull's fertility.

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Why feeding at night could offset calving

2021-03-02T14:31:56+00:00February 14, 2018|Calving|

Monitoring your herd at calving time is of paramount importance if you’re looking to wipe out calf mortality.

However, this can be difficult when you’ve only got 24 hours in the day and your cows could begin calving at any moment.

However, this one little trick could help it happen at the right time. Feed your calvers at night.

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